Helping your child with homework

Print article For many parents, the subject of math arouses feelings of anxiety — perhaps conjuring up memories of timed tests, difficult concepts, or embarrassing mistakes made in class. If you think of math as something that other people are good at or that has no practical use, your attitude may undermine your ability to coach your child. Take the fear and frustration out of math homework by pointing out how numbers are used in your home on a daily basis.

Helping your child with homework

Tips for helping your elementary school child with math homework | Parenting

Print What is it about homework that wears families out? Even newbie grade-schoolers, who love doing it at first, often lose their enthusiasm and start stalling.

And after a long day, you just want your kiddo to knuckle down so you can get dinner on the table or start the bedtime routine.

But playing cop rarely works — micromanaging and nagging only make kids feel stupid or frustrated. Think of yourself as a coach and cheerleader. Their work-like-magic tips are guaranteed to bring harmony back into your homework routine, whether your child is a kindergartner or a fifth-grader, a whiner or a procrastinator!

Do It as Early as Possible: Best for Everyone On days when there are no afternoon activities, give your child a time frame — say, between 3 p. This gives her some control over her schedule some kids need a longer break after school, and others need to start right away to keep the momentum going.

If you work, that means homework duties will fall to the after-school caregiver.

Top 10 Homework Tips

Create a Call List: Best for Forgetters From kindergarten on, kids need a list of three or four classmates they can call on when they forget an assignment, says Ann Dolin, M. The study buddy can read your child the spelling words over the phone, or his mom can snap a pic of the worksheet and text it to you.

That alone can help him remember how to do the rest. Then heap on the praise: Try the next one now. Have your child show you similar problems he worked on in class.

That may jog his memory so he can retrace the steps. Cut It in Half: If your child is completely lost, you can excuse her entirely. In the other cases, shorten the assignment, says Cathy Vatterott, Ph. Most teachers will be understanding if a student does this once in a while, says Grace, but if your child frequently fails to finish her assignments, there will probably be a consequence.

Look how well you wrote your letters in this part! Best for Procrastinators Sometimes a pint-size foot dragger just needs a jump-start. At that point, she can take a short break or keep going — and many kids continue.

Best for 3rd- to 5th-Graders Many teachers will break down big projects into a series of deadlines so that children learn to budget time. Together, divide the project into steps, then help her estimate how much time each will take.

To get the most out of your calendar, include everything — from basketball practice on Mondays to the reading log every night so you both can plan realistically.

Hold off, says Dr. Your process may confuse her even more. You can help your child by talking to her about what she remembers from class and steering her to the textbook.» Tips for helping your elementary school child with math homework Tips for helping your elementary school child with math homework Exploring math in everyday .

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The hours in a school day and the amount of time a teacher can spend individually with students are limited. As a result, teachers need the understanding and help of parents and families in supporting classroom instruction and learning outside school hours.

Helping your child with homework

Helping Your Child With Homework This article answers common questions that parents, family members, and caregivers often ask about homework. The booklet also includes practical ideas for helping children to complete homework assignments successfully.

Helping Your Child With Homework Homework: A Concern for the Whole Family Homework is an opportunity for children to learn and for families to be involved in their children's education.

Homework booklet for parents of elementary and junior high school students. Helps parents understand why homework is important and makes suggestions for . Their work-like-magic tips are guaranteed to bring harmony back into your homework routine, whether your child is a kindergartner or a fifth-grader, a whiner or a procrastinator!

1. Do It as Early as Possible: Best for Everyone.

Tips for Helping Your Child with Homework